How to secure access to MinIO server with TLS Slack

This guide explains how to configure MinIO Server with TLS certificates on Linux and Windows platforms.

  1. Install MinIO Server
  2. Use an Existing Key and Certificate with MinIO
  3. Generate and use Self-signed Keys and Certificates with MinIO
  4. Install Certificates from Third-party CAs

1. Install MinIO Server

Install MinIO Server using the instructions in the MinIO Quickstart Guide.

2. Use an Existing Key and Certificate with MinIO

This section describes how to use a private key and public certificate that have been obtained from a certificate authority (CA). If these files have not been obtained, skip to 3. Generate Self-signed Certificates or generate them with Let's Encrypt using these instructions: https://docs.min.io/docs/generate-let-s-encypt-certificate-using-concert-for-minio.

Copy the existing private key and public certificate to the certs directory. The default certs directory is:

Note:

3. Generate and use Self-signed Keys and Certificates with MinIO

This section describes how to generate a self-signed certificate using various tools:

Note:

3.1 Use generate_cert.go to Generate a Certificate

Download generate_cert.go.

generate_cert.go is a simple Go tool to generate self-signed certificates, and provides SAN certificates with DNS and IP entries:

go run generate_cert.go -ca --host "10.10.0.3"

A response similar to this one should be displayed:

2018/11/21 10:16:18 wrote cert.pem
2018/11/21 10:16:18 wrote key.pem

Rename cert.pem to public.crt and key.pem to private.key.

3.2 Use OpenSSL to Generate a Certificate

Use one of the following methods to generate a certificate using openssl:

3.2.1 Generate a private key with ECDSA.

Use the following command to generate a private key with ECDSA:

openssl ecparam -genkey -name prime256v1 | openssl ec -out private.key

A response similar to this one should be displayed:

read EC key
writing EC key

Alternatively, use the following command to generate a private ECDSA key protected by a password:

openssl ecparam -genkey -name prime256v1 | openssl ec -aes256 -out private.key -passout pass:PASSWORD

Note: NIST curves P-384 and P-521 are not currently supported.

3.2.2 Generate a private key with RSA.

Use the following command to generate a private key with RSA:

openssl genrsa -out private.key 2048

A response similar to this one should be displayed:

Generating RSA private key, 2048 bit long modulus
............................................+++
...........+++
e is 65537 (0x10001)

Alternatively, use the following command to generate a private RSA key protected by a password:

openssl genrsa -aes256 -out private.key 2048 -passout pass:PASSWORD

Note: When using a password-protected private key, the password must be provided through the environment variable MINIO_CERT_PASSWD using the following command:

export MINIO_CERT_PASSWD=<PASSWORD>

The default OpenSSL format for private encrypted keys is PKCS-8, but MinIO only supports PKCS-1. An RSA key that has been formatted with PKCS-8 can be converted to PKCS-1 using the following command:

openssl rsa -in private-pkcs8-key.key -aes256 -passout pass:PASSWORD -out private.key

3.2.3 Generate a self-signed certificate.

Use the following command to generate a self-signed certificate and enter a passphrase when prompted:

openssl req -new -x509 -days 3650 -key private.key -out public.crt -subj "/C=US/ST=state/L=location/O=organization/CN=<domain.com>"

Note: Replace <domain.com> with the development domain name.

Alternatively, use the command below to generate a self-signed wildcard certificate that is valid for all subdomains under <domain.com>. Wildcard certificates are useful for deploying distributed MinIO instances, where each instance runs on a subdomain under a single parent domain.

openssl req -new -x509 -days 3650 -key private.key -out public.crt -subj "/C=US/ST=state/L=location/O=organization/CN=<*.domain.com>"

3.3 Use OpenSSL (with IP address) to Generate a Certificate

This section describes how to specify an IP address to openssl when generating a certificate.

3.3.1 Create a configuration file.

Create a file named openssl.conf with the content below. Change IP.1 to point to the correct IP address:

[req]
distinguished_name = req_distinguished_name
x509_extensions = v3_req
prompt = no

[req_distinguished_name]
C = US
ST = VA
L = Somewhere
O = MyOrg
OU = MyOU
CN = MyServerName

[v3_req]
subjectAltName = @alt_names

[alt_names]
IP.1 = 127.0.0.1

3.3.2 Run openssl and specify the configuration file:

openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 730 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout private.key -out public.crt -config openssl.conf

3.4 Use GnuTLS (for Windows) to Generate a Certificate

This section describes how to use GnuTLS on Windows to generate a certificate.

3.4.1 Install and configure GnuTLS.

Download and decompress the Windows version of GnuTLS from here.

Use PowerShell to add the path of the extracted GnuTLS binary to the system path:

setx path "%path%;C:\Users\MyUser\Downloads\gnutls-3.4.9-w64\bin"

Note: PowerShell may need to be restarted for this change to take effect.

3.4.2 Generate a private key:

Run the following command to generate a private .key file:

certtool.exe --generate-privkey --outfile private.key

A response similar to this one should be displayed:

Generating a 3072 bit RSA private key...

####3.4.3 Generate a public certificate:

Create a file called cert.cnf with the content below. This file contains all of the information necessary to generate a certificate using certtool.exe:

# X.509 Certificate options
#
# DN options

# The organization of the subject.
organization = "Example Inc."

# The organizational unit of the subject.
#unit = "sleeping dept."

# The state of the certificate owner.
state = "Example"

# The country of the subject. Two letter code.
country = "EX"

# The common name of the certificate owner.
cn = "Sally Certowner"

# In how many days, counting from today, this certificate will expire.
expiration_days = 365

# X.509 v3 extensions

# DNS name(s) of the server
dns_name = "localhost"

# (Optional) Server IP address
ip_address = "127.0.0.1"

# Whether this certificate will be used for a TLS server
tls_www_server

Run certtool.exe and specify the configuration file to generate a certificate:

certtool.exe --generate-self-signed --load-privkey private.key --template cert.cnf --outfile public.crt

4. Install Certificates from Third-party CAs

MinIO can connect to other servers, including MinIO nodes or other server types such as NATs and Redis. If these servers use certificates that were not registered with a known CA, add trust for these certificates to MinIO Server by placing these certificates under one of the following MinIO configuration paths:

Explore Further